WEEK 3.

UNDERSTANDING KEY TERMS.

Without context, looking and thinking critically about a visual text becomes more difficult. This is because the background history that fuels the creation of visual texts plays a large part in the comprehension of the work itself. Looking and thinking critically about visual texts can only occur once the reader has understood the history and purpose of the work. Then they are able to appreciate the background of visual texts and ask further interpretive questions.

 

WRITING RESPONSE.

OPTION B.

The authors are very straight forward when talking about most students preconceived ideas of “going to university to learn to think” (Wallace 45). I agree with their statement that “good thinking is at the heart of academic enterprise” (Wallace 46), as I understand that being able to think critically and test the boundaries will lead to further forming of new ideas. I have learnt the manners of ‘Sun Tzu’ where they explain that to be successful is to find new solutions through assessing issues.

The author’s voices sound very knowledgeable and their tone is very concise as if speaking in a lecture. The pronouns that they use are mainly ‘you’, as if they are speaking directly at us, giving us formal advice, talking to them in conversation. I appreciate their tone and approach through addressing the audience as ‘you’, I have easily responded well to their concise and informative writings. The author’s sound as if they are very wise and position themselves in educated and experienced training. Not very politically or personally influenced, however I believe that their experiences with studying different thinking abilities, they feel more authoritative in allowing students to understand the successes in critical thinking. I did enjoy reading this text, there were some words I did not understand, such as ‘paradigm’, however in the next sentence they did give a short definition.

 

PREPARATION COMPONENT A.

 

DRAFT 1

Critical thinking of a visual text is about questioning and the thorough evaluation of work and/or processes of a work outcome. In my opinion, critical thinking is deciding what is real, where our judgment of what is right and wrong through our preconceived ideas is tested.

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it challenges our preconceived ideas of things, stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements. Humans are always thinking outside of the box, especially artists/ designers, “…humans have turned the planet into one enormous artefact, the largest work of art ever made possible” (Mirzoeff 15). Our ability to test how convincing visual texts are, enhance the evolution of human achievements as viewers are pushed to think differently. Our preconceived ideas are challenged through the continuous change in visual culture. The site, ‘Te Papa Tongarewa’ is a national museum and art gallery in Wellington, where it has been refurbished to suit heightened modern taste, an example of constant critical feedback. Everywhere we look, visual texts become a “mental model we all have of how to see, and what we can do as a result” (Mirzoeff 11).

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it allows the history and message of the work to be better understood. Understanding the messages hidden behind a visual text allow the viewer to build that bridge between art and the mind of the artist. “Our species has always relied on its ability to understand… what an artist wants to communicate” (Annals, Cunnane 17), we have the desire to have questions answered quickly, once we understand the context of visual texts we reach a better understanding and also are able to appreciate the art and design practise even more. An example of the importance of this process can be understood with the visual text, ‘The Family’, 1998 by Paratene Matchitt in New Zealand.

His ideas were based on showing a Maori family that embodied a modernist European lifestyle, creating a link between Maori and European culture. This example shows meaning and purpose of the visual text, by understanding the context and origins of the work, the viewer is able to ask further detailed questions which is an important part of building relationships between artist and viewer.

In conclusion, I agree that the process of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practises. This is because they challenge our preconceived ideas of things, stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements and allow the history and message of the work to be better understood.

 

DRAFT 2

Critical thinking of a visual text is about questioning and the thorough evaluation of work and/or processes of a work outcome. In my opinion, critical thinking is deciding what is real, where our judgment of what is right and wrong through our preconceived ideas is tested.

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it challenges our preconceived ideas of things, stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements. Humans are always thinking outside of the box, especially artists/ designers, “…humans have turned the planet into one enormous artefact, the largest work of art ever made possible” (Mirzoeff 15). Our ability to test how convincing visual texts are, enhance the evolution of human achievements as viewers are pushed to think differently. Our preconceived ideas are challenged through the continuous change in visual culture. The site, ‘Te Papa Tongarewa’ is a national museum and art gallery in Wellington, where it has been refurbished to suit heightened modern taste, an example of constant critical feedback. Everywhere we look, visual texts become a “mental model we all have of how to see, and what we can do as a result” (Mirzoeff 11).

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it allows the history and message of the work to be better understood. Understanding the messages hidden behind a visual text allow the viewer to build that bridge between art and the mind of the artist. “Our species has always relied on its ability to understand… what an artist wants to communicate” (Annals, Cunnane 17), we have the desire to have questions answered quickly, once we understand the context of visual texts we reach a better understanding and also are able to appreciate the art and design practise even more. An example of the importance of this process can be understood with the visual text, ‘The Family’, 1998 by Paratene Matchitt in New Zealand. His ideas were based on showing a Maori family that embodied a modernist European lifestyle, creating a link between Maori and European culture. This example shows meaning and purpose of the visual text, by understanding the context and origins of the work, the viewer is able to ask further detailed questions which is an important part of building relationships between artist and viewer.

Another key point about why the process of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practises is the ability to form new ideas which allow the further development of artworks. Between viewer and artist, the visual text is the link that fuels imagination and purpose. The constant back and forth of ideas circulated between artist and viewers, allow artists to continuously experiment with artworks and viewers to further question them, “…our endless appetite for new readings… allowing the work to keep on generating ideas beyond its physical completion” (Annals, Cunnane 24).

In conclusion, I agree that the process of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practises. This is because they challenge our preconceived ideas of things, stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements and allow the history and message of the work to be better understood and lastly the ability to form new ideas which allow further development of artworks.

 

DRAFT 3

Communications in Creative Cultures. 237.130. Component A. Jasmine Chin. 16030171. Assessment 1. 550 words.

Critical thinking of a visual text is about questioning and the thorough evaluation of work and/or processes of a work outcome. In my opinion, critical thinking is deciding what is real, where our judgment of what is right and wrong through our preconceived ideas is tested.

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it challenges our preconceived ideas of things, stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements. Humans are always thinking outside of the box, especially artists/ designers, “…humans have turned the planet into one enormous artefact, the largest work of art ever made possible” (Mirzoeff 15). Our ability to test how convincing visual texts are, enhance the evolution of human achievements as viewers are pushed to think differently. Our preconceived ideas are challenged through the continuous change in visual culture. The site, ‘Te Papa Tongarewa’ is a national museum and art gallery in Wellington, where it has been refurbished inside to suit heightened modern taste, an example of constant critical feedback. Everywhere we look, visual texts become a “mental model we all have of how to see, and what we can do as a result” (Mirzoeff 11). Between the viewer and artist, the visual text is the link that fuels imagination and purpose. The constant back and forth of ideas circulated between artist and viewers, allow viewers think of new ideas and to ask further questions, also allowing artists to continuously experiment with artworks, “…allowing the work to keep on generating ideas beyond its physical completion” (Annals, Cunnane 24). Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts allow various judgements and ideas to surface, challenging old ideas with new evidence. Important to art and design practises to continuously obtain knowledge, stretching creative boundaries of the mind to construct something ground breaking and innovative.

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it allows the history and message of the work to be better understood. Understanding the messages hidden behind a visual text allow the viewer to build that bridge between art, history and the mind of the artist. “Our species has always relied on its ability to understand… what an artist wants to communicate” (Annals, Cunnane 17), once we understand the context of visual texts we reach a better understanding and also are able to appreciate the art and design practise even more. An example of the importance of this process can be understood with the visual text, ‘The Family’, 1998 by Paratene Matchitt in New Zealand. His idea of a Maori family embodying a modernist European lifestyle, link between Maori and European culture. This example shows meaning and purpose of the visual text, by understanding the context and origins of the work, the viewer is able to ask further detailed questions, an important part of building relationships between artwork, artist and viewer. Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts allow deeper comprehension and connection to the story behind it.

In conclusion, I agree that the process of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practises. This is because they challenge our preconceived ideas of things; stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements and allow the history and message of the work to be better understood.

 

 

Works cited:

(Annals, Alison, Abby Cunnane, and Sam Cunnane. “Working with Images and Ideas.” Saying What You See:How to Write and Talk about Art. North Shore, N.Z.: Pearson Ed. N.Z., 2009. Print)

(Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Introduction”. How to See the World. London: Pelican, 2015. Print)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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