WEEK 3.

UNDERSTANDING KEY TERMS.

Without context, looking and thinking critically about a visual text becomes more difficult. This is because the background history that fuels the creation of visual texts plays a large part in the comprehension of the work itself. Looking and thinking critically about visual texts can only occur once the reader has understood the history and purpose of the work. Then they are able to appreciate the background of visual texts and ask further interpretive questions.

 

WRITING RESPONSE.

OPTION B.

The authors are very straight forward when talking about most students preconceived ideas of “going to university to learn to think” (Wallace 45). I agree with their statement that “good thinking is at the heart of academic enterprise” (Wallace 46), as I understand that being able to think critically and test the boundaries will lead to further forming of new ideas. I have learnt the manners of ‘Sun Tzu’ where they explain that to be successful is to find new solutions through assessing issues.

The author’s voices sound very knowledgeable and their tone is very concise as if speaking in a lecture. The pronouns that they use are mainly ‘you’, as if they are speaking directly at us, giving us formal advice, talking to them in conversation. I appreciate their tone and approach through addressing the audience as ‘you’, I have easily responded well to their concise and informative writings. The author’s sound as if they are very wise and position themselves in educated and experienced training. Not very politically or personally influenced, however I believe that their experiences with studying different thinking abilities, they feel more authoritative in allowing students to understand the successes in critical thinking. I did enjoy reading this text, there were some words I did not understand, such as ‘paradigm’, however in the next sentence they did give a short definition.

 

PREPARATION COMPONENT A.

 

DRAFT 1

Critical thinking of a visual text is about questioning and the thorough evaluation of work and/or processes of a work outcome. In my opinion, critical thinking is deciding what is real, where our judgment of what is right and wrong through our preconceived ideas is tested.

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it challenges our preconceived ideas of things, stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements. Humans are always thinking outside of the box, especially artists/ designers, “…humans have turned the planet into one enormous artefact, the largest work of art ever made possible” (Mirzoeff 15). Our ability to test how convincing visual texts are, enhance the evolution of human achievements as viewers are pushed to think differently. Our preconceived ideas are challenged through the continuous change in visual culture. The site, ‘Te Papa Tongarewa’ is a national museum and art gallery in Wellington, where it has been refurbished to suit heightened modern taste, an example of constant critical feedback. Everywhere we look, visual texts become a “mental model we all have of how to see, and what we can do as a result” (Mirzoeff 11).

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it allows the history and message of the work to be better understood. Understanding the messages hidden behind a visual text allow the viewer to build that bridge between art and the mind of the artist. “Our species has always relied on its ability to understand… what an artist wants to communicate” (Annals, Cunnane 17), we have the desire to have questions answered quickly, once we understand the context of visual texts we reach a better understanding and also are able to appreciate the art and design practise even more. An example of the importance of this process can be understood with the visual text, ‘The Family’, 1998 by Paratene Matchitt in New Zealand.

His ideas were based on showing a Maori family that embodied a modernist European lifestyle, creating a link between Maori and European culture. This example shows meaning and purpose of the visual text, by understanding the context and origins of the work, the viewer is able to ask further detailed questions which is an important part of building relationships between artist and viewer.

In conclusion, I agree that the process of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practises. This is because they challenge our preconceived ideas of things, stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements and allow the history and message of the work to be better understood.

 

DRAFT 2

Critical thinking of a visual text is about questioning and the thorough evaluation of work and/or processes of a work outcome. In my opinion, critical thinking is deciding what is real, where our judgment of what is right and wrong through our preconceived ideas is tested.

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it challenges our preconceived ideas of things, stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements. Humans are always thinking outside of the box, especially artists/ designers, “…humans have turned the planet into one enormous artefact, the largest work of art ever made possible” (Mirzoeff 15). Our ability to test how convincing visual texts are, enhance the evolution of human achievements as viewers are pushed to think differently. Our preconceived ideas are challenged through the continuous change in visual culture. The site, ‘Te Papa Tongarewa’ is a national museum and art gallery in Wellington, where it has been refurbished to suit heightened modern taste, an example of constant critical feedback. Everywhere we look, visual texts become a “mental model we all have of how to see, and what we can do as a result” (Mirzoeff 11).

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it allows the history and message of the work to be better understood. Understanding the messages hidden behind a visual text allow the viewer to build that bridge between art and the mind of the artist. “Our species has always relied on its ability to understand… what an artist wants to communicate” (Annals, Cunnane 17), we have the desire to have questions answered quickly, once we understand the context of visual texts we reach a better understanding and also are able to appreciate the art and design practise even more. An example of the importance of this process can be understood with the visual text, ‘The Family’, 1998 by Paratene Matchitt in New Zealand. His ideas were based on showing a Maori family that embodied a modernist European lifestyle, creating a link between Maori and European culture. This example shows meaning and purpose of the visual text, by understanding the context and origins of the work, the viewer is able to ask further detailed questions which is an important part of building relationships between artist and viewer.

Another key point about why the process of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practises is the ability to form new ideas which allow the further development of artworks. Between viewer and artist, the visual text is the link that fuels imagination and purpose. The constant back and forth of ideas circulated between artist and viewers, allow artists to continuously experiment with artworks and viewers to further question them, “…our endless appetite for new readings… allowing the work to keep on generating ideas beyond its physical completion” (Annals, Cunnane 24).

In conclusion, I agree that the process of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practises. This is because they challenge our preconceived ideas of things, stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements and allow the history and message of the work to be better understood and lastly the ability to form new ideas which allow further development of artworks.

 

DRAFT 3

Communications in Creative Cultures. 237.130. Component A. Jasmine Chin. 16030171. Assessment 1. 550 words.

Critical thinking of a visual text is about questioning and the thorough evaluation of work and/or processes of a work outcome. In my opinion, critical thinking is deciding what is real, where our judgment of what is right and wrong through our preconceived ideas is tested.

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it challenges our preconceived ideas of things, stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements. Humans are always thinking outside of the box, especially artists/ designers, “…humans have turned the planet into one enormous artefact, the largest work of art ever made possible” (Mirzoeff 15). Our ability to test how convincing visual texts are, enhance the evolution of human achievements as viewers are pushed to think differently. Our preconceived ideas are challenged through the continuous change in visual culture. The site, ‘Te Papa Tongarewa’ is a national museum and art gallery in Wellington, where it has been refurbished inside to suit heightened modern taste, an example of constant critical feedback. Everywhere we look, visual texts become a “mental model we all have of how to see, and what we can do as a result” (Mirzoeff 11). Between the viewer and artist, the visual text is the link that fuels imagination and purpose. The constant back and forth of ideas circulated between artist and viewers, allow viewers think of new ideas and to ask further questions, also allowing artists to continuously experiment with artworks, “…allowing the work to keep on generating ideas beyond its physical completion” (Annals, Cunnane 24). Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts allow various judgements and ideas to surface, challenging old ideas with new evidence. Important to art and design practises to continuously obtain knowledge, stretching creative boundaries of the mind to construct something ground breaking and innovative.

Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts is important to art and design practises as it allows the history and message of the work to be better understood. Understanding the messages hidden behind a visual text allow the viewer to build that bridge between art, history and the mind of the artist. “Our species has always relied on its ability to understand… what an artist wants to communicate” (Annals, Cunnane 17), once we understand the context of visual texts we reach a better understanding and also are able to appreciate the art and design practise even more. An example of the importance of this process can be understood with the visual text, ‘The Family’, 1998 by Paratene Matchitt in New Zealand. His idea of a Maori family embodying a modernist European lifestyle, link between Maori and European culture. This example shows meaning and purpose of the visual text, by understanding the context and origins of the work, the viewer is able to ask further detailed questions, an important part of building relationships between artwork, artist and viewer. Looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts allow deeper comprehension and connection to the story behind it.

In conclusion, I agree that the process of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practises. This is because they challenge our preconceived ideas of things; stretching boundaries of artist/ human achievements and allow the history and message of the work to be better understood.

 

 

Works cited:

(Annals, Alison, Abby Cunnane, and Sam Cunnane. “Working with Images and Ideas.” Saying What You See:How to Write and Talk about Art. North Shore, N.Z.: Pearson Ed. N.Z., 2009. Print)

(Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Introduction”. How to See the World. London: Pelican, 2015. Print)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GLOSSARY.

  • Universal Medium- (Mirzoeff 6)In context of using social media as a type of interconnected source, keeping in touch with people on a universal and worldwide scale. Also a form of mass media and interconnectivity over the internet.

 

  • Visual text- an “impression of the people, things, places or events that we witnessed” (Clarke, Michael. “Language and Meaning.” Verbalising the Visual: Translating Art and Design into Words. Lausanne, Switzerland: AVA Publishing, 2007. Page 2. Print), interpreting by ourselves what is translated through an image.

 

  • Worldview in relation to audience- Everyone has a different view of the world, these differing opinions “sometimes, open disagreement can arise” (Clarke 5), however in relation to the audience, their worldview provide a common basis for understanding.

 

  • Context/contextualising- helps us to conclude the “specific work, exhibition, style or movement” (Clarke 3) give the ability to locate it in a particular time and place. “Factor understood. Contribute to a fuller understanding and appreciation” (Clarke 4)

 

  • Anthropocene- the current time period where human activity has been most dominant on the environment and the planet. Our species are shaping and instrumenting nature’s landscapes.

 

  • Geology- the main focus of issues of the Earth through scientific experiments and observations. Dealing with the history and study of the natural materials around us.

 

  • Colonisation– the movement and spreading of any species to a new territory/ area in which they desire to take over, where they are to build a new life and home.

 

  • Credible- trustworthy material, convincing argument and evidence.

 

  • Verifiable- confirmed evidence, material that has been proved just and accurate.

 

  • Ideology- is an idea of how society is supposed to function and ultimately work. Economically, politically and socially, we base our ideas on what we perceive as ‘normal’ lifestyles, our expectations and beliefs on how we look at our world.

     

WEEK 2.

SITE DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS.

 

Contemporary Art Gallery Floor 5 Te Papa Tongarewa

Te Papa Tongarewa is the national museum and art gallery of New Zealand, located in Wellington. Its main purpose is to showcase, inspire and inform the community of the various forms of bicultural art works. People know that it is a museum because of its grandeur size and also due to the billboards and posters that advertise new exhibitions inside the museum.

IMG_7546

This site was constructed in 1998, where it communicates New Zealand’s participation in recognising worldwide history. The fifth floor is very open and spacious for people to move freely around, an impression where anyone can relax and enjoy the artworks that are displayed on walls, ceiling and the ground. Most people that come to the museum to delve deeper into the history of the world through the works made by those during the time. The target audience ranging from children with families to older generations.

(Chin, Jasmine. Contemporary Art Gallery Floor 5 Te Papa Museum. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

IMG_7543

The floors are made of pine, the ceiling is concrete however hidden by planks of timber. I would love to come back here, as its attitude is a quiet relaxing environment where people can focus on their surroundings.

(Chin, Jasmine. Contemporary Art Gallery Floor 5 Te Papa Museum. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

 

IMG_7547

 

 

The security cameras alert staff of any person that crosses the infra-red light boundary of an artwork. There are at least two lights for every painting, one big focused for the artwork and smaller tube light for the information text on the side.

(Chin, Jasmine. Contemporary Art Gallery Floor 5 Te Papa Museum. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

 

 

 

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On the site, there were four chairs and a table for people to sit which is exactly what my group and I did, this tells us that the pace can be used to relax and even possibly reflect on the artworks. There are staff in red and blue t-shirt uniforms who keep an eye out for people who are touching works. The site also has pillars that emphasise an artwork and draws the most attention because it secludes it from the rest which I found very effective of the room layout.

(Chin, Jasmine. Contemporary Art Gallery Floor 5 Te Papa Museum. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

IMG_7541

The texts that describe the artworks are not only in English, but are also in Maori, showing the appreciation of Maori culture in the museum and how New Zealand’s identity is not only European but Maori too, indicating the mutual respect in our country.

(Chin, Jasmine. Contemporary Art Gallery Floor 5 Te Papa Museum. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adam Art Gallery Victoria University

IMG_7577

This site was constructed 21st September 1999, communicating a collection of modern and contemporary New Zealand art. This industrialised site paths natural light throughout the floors, the impression of the site is very modern with abstract wall cut outs and contemporary materials used for the building.

 

(Chin, Jasmine. Adam Art Gallery Victoria University. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

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Most people come to this art museum to witness Victoria University staff and art education collections. The target audience is mainly for an older audience as it is not as convenient to travel for most families. The floors are covered with rubber to absorb light and noise of people walking around the site, and steel fixtures to add to the industrialised theme.

(Chin, Jasmine. Adam Art Gallery Victoria University. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

 

 

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I would love to come back to look at new exhibitions, also the attitude of the site is very welcoming as it has an open space on the top level for people to look out over the floor below, linking floors and people together.

(Chin, Jasmine. Adam Art Gallery Victoria University. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

 

 

 

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On site, there was a couch for people to sit on, which my group did, placed on a balcony for people to look over the floor down and sparked good conversation about artworks, this was good for reflecting.

(Chin, Jasmine. Adam Art Gallery Victoria University. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

 

 

 

 

 

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There was only one staff at the front desk to welcome people in and wore a black top for uniform. The site also had a flight of short stairs leading up to a stage with an artwork centralised on it, this is interesting as it leads people into walking up and taking a closer look at the detail.

(Chin, Jasmine. Adam Art Gallery Victoria University. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

 

 

 

COMPARING AND CONTRASTING.

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Both Art Galleries are similar in a sense that they have strategically placed artworks harmoniously with pillars and unusual spaces in the space. Unusual spaces, for example, a pillar that projects from the wall makes the artwork in front feel dominant and eye catching, and also the steps to an artwork on stage makes you want to look closer.

(Chin, Jasmine. Contemporary Art Gallery Floor 5 Te Papa Museum. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

 

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One of the differences between the Art Galleries is the construction theme of the buildings. Adam Art Gallery used more constructive and metal materials, such as metal, steel, smaller windows and rubber floors which gave it a more modern style. Compared to Te Papa which had a more classical style, with pine flooring and large windows.

(Chin, Jasmine. Adam Art Gallery Victoria University. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

 

 

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Another difference would be the detailed thought about the construction of the buildings. Adam Art Gallery seemed to concentrate more on people’s experience, as they had specifically used rubber floors to block out the sound of footsteps, it also absorbs noise and light so the people would be able to focus on the artworks alone, rather than other distractions. Te Papa has not specifically looked at people’s experience in much depth, however they do have chairs and activities that invite people to relax and have fun.

(Chin, Jasmine. Contemporary Art Gallery Floor 5 Te Papa Museum. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

 

VISUAL TEXT ANALYSIS.

 

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(Chin, Jasmine. Contemporary Art Gallery Floor 5 Te Papa Museum. Chin, Jasmine. 2016. Photograph)

Made in 1966 ‘The Family’ was hand carved by Paratene Matchitt in New Zealand, where this sculpture is placed in the ‘Maori Modern Art’ area. Three figures are horizontally aligned beside each other, made from wood and paint, to look like abstract beings with heads, legs and other identifiable gender parts. His ideas were based on Eurpoean modernism, showing a family that embodied a modernist European lifestyle, the text on the wall states, “the family grew out of trying to bring together a European world and a Maori world”, where he explores international modern art however keeps to the traditional Maori carving techniques. I believe that this artwork was deemed important to be housed because of its rich Maori traditions and European influence creating a link between Maori and European culture. The museum appreciates the works of our New Zealand identity as a whole.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT ME.

Hi my name is Jasmine Chin,

I am a student at Massey University in Wellington studying Visual Communications and am working towards my Bachelor of Design Degree. My design identity leans more towards deconstruction and the various ways in which media, images and text can be manipulated to create positive and negative reactions.

My parents have come from Kuching, Malaysia, and have moved to Christchurch, New Zealand where I have been born and raised. I would describe myself as a sporty and creative person, in my spare time I enjoy painting, drawing, listening to music, swimming, aikido (self-defense), playing netball and tennis.

I am very curious and aware of everything around me. On short walks or drives, I tend to look closely and examine buildings, adverts and everyday objects around me. I usually think about the drafting and process that is taken to produce these structures, how different groups would perceive advertisements and the amount of creative people there are in the world that are able to envision new ideas every day. This is why I am interested in design and how I am curious about our world and how everything is how it is today, this is what I find amazing.

In ten years time, or earlier, I would love to work in an advertising firm that develop and shape well known international brands and companies, such as Nike and Apple. I aspire to become an international graphic designer who has the tools and skills to commercialise controversial social and political ideas through design and advertising. Building deeper meanings hidden within simple statements and media forms.

 

Influential artists:

David Carson.

As a grunge designer, Carson had no rules for typography. His ability to break design boundaries through rough distortions of text/ images and allow his creations to run wild by placing anything anywhere on the page. His influence on my work has allowed me to take essential risks in order to explore new techniques.

blah
Carson, David. ‘BLAH BLAH BLAH.’ kingdomofstyle.typepad.co.uk. Global Jet Setter. 21st Mar 2011. Web. 8th Mar 2016.

 

 

 

 

bowie
Carson, David. ‘Ray Gun.’ classes.dma.ucla.edu. The Forever Theme. 5th Nov 2013. Web. 6th Mar 2016.

 

 

Terry Jones.

Jones pushed the limits of print, type and typography. Printers were the only source of ‘Photoshop’ during the 80’s, however he instantly put together materials using low budget resources. He believes

“design is something that shouldn’t be complicated”

(eyemagazine.com. Eye Magazine. John. L Walters. 1998. Web. 8th Mar 2016.)

and his hands on approach was truly ground breaking.

straight
Jones, Terry. ‘i-D magazine.’ aiga.org/defining-style-making-i-d/. Word Press. 6th Jun 2015. Web. 4th Mar 2016.

 

id
Jones, Terry. ‘i-D magazine.’ lateissue.nl. Stephen Heller. 16th Mar 2006. Web. 5th Mar 2016.

 

PERSONAL RESPONSE.

Critical thinking is about questioning and thorough evaluation of work and/or processes of an outcome. In my opinion, critical thinking means trying to determine what is true, where our judgment of what is right and wrong through our preconceived ideas is tested. By critiquing and analysing, we test our own ideas and that of others to comprehend whether it is convincing and logical. Critical thinking affects how we engage with the world as our curiosity of being open to new ideas give us the means to ask questions, leading us into understanding something new and making us want to try new things.

 

READING REFLECTION.

  • “We feel compelled to make images of it and share them with others as a key part of our effort to understand the changing world around us and our place within it.” (Mirzoeff 6) This made me question my own existence, and that the only way people will remember me on this earth would be through stories, images and videos of me I had taken or other people would have recorded.
  • “If we put these factors of growing, networked cities with a majority youthful population, and a changing climate, what we get is a formula for change.” (Mirzoeff 7) This is interesting because he lists all the things we have created on this planet that are becoming problems. We understand the risks however, we have not come up with a solution to change.

 

 

WRITING RESPONSE.

Her key ideas are mainly about retaining her culture and Maori identity in a school where she finds it difficult to do so, education not being a big priority to her as she wants to focus more on her heritage with family and her own Maori community and lastly, the conflicting problem of politics between Pakeha and Maori history where her culture seems to be constantly undermined. Overall her perspective is heavily influenced by her traditional Maori roots and that she is willing to focus more on her heritage and traditions, faithful to her ancestry.

She seems to have a harsh tone against Pakeha when she speaks, also uses ‘I’ and not directly ‘we’ however gives off the means of community when she talks about her mother and grandmother etc. This writing comes from a more personal view where she is expressing her thoughts about how Maori always seem to be undermined by Pakeha and her struggles in a community she cannot be herself in. She has a very direct approach and has a formal impression as she addresses her struggles in writing a thesis, and the reasons for this. There were some Maori words that I did not understand, however in a wide context I was able to put together that ‘Kaupapa’ meat culture/ tradition. I have enjoyed this text because of her honesty and faithfulness to her heritage and culture which inspires me.